About

Just a Central Florida blogger.

Although I lean right and post of my political posts will reflect that, I just don’t want to merely regurgitate the points made on thousands of blogs and sites.  If I post on something, it’s because I think I have an angle on it that’s not been noted or explored before.  Or at least not that I’ve noticed.  I hope to provide an insight or view that’s unique.

Eh, or not.

I also am of the firm opinion that experts don’t know everything, are frequently wrong, and I think the bowing before credentialed authority is bad for representative government and bad for the country in general.

Contact me at mikestreetstation at gmail.com

4 thoughts on “About

  1. Your article on “The Shrinking Need for a Workforce” addresses the central issue of our amazing age. How blessed we are having a marvellous technology enabling us to produce more and more of our desired and/or needed goods and services with decreasing human effort with an ever-growing opportunity for expanding leisure in a cultured society. The so-called “problem” of growing “unemployment” is not a problem at all if we divorce the right to consumption from earned incomes. What constitutes the problem is an insufficiency of total incomes Your article on “The Shrinking Need for a Workforce” addresses the central issue of our amazing age. How blessed we are having a marvellous technology enabling us to produce more and more of our desired and/or needed goods and services with decreasing human effort with an ever-growing opportunity for expanding leisure in a cultured society. The so-called “problem” of growing “unemployment” is not a problem at all if we divorce the right to consumption from earned incomes. What constitutes the problem is an insufficiency of total incomes relative to total costs and prices as the need for paid work is reduced. In the days of Merry England the people enjoyed approximately 150 holidays per year and yet at a much lower level of technology yet still provided for their living needs. That we should attempt to maintain “full-emplayment” in the present age of super-production is a complete anachronism..

    Nearly a century ago the progressive displacement of labour by technology was observed and accurately predicted to increase exponentially by the late British engineer, Major Clifford Hugh Douglas whose ideas became known a Social Credit. Douglas explained the necessity to devise a method of distribution independent upon paid labour. While Assistant Director of the Royal Aircraft factory at farnborough and through study of the accounts of approximately one-hundred other British firms he confirmed that every factory, except any facing bankruptcy, creates financial costs and prices in greater volume than it distributes effective incomes. An increasing “gap” is created between final prices and effective consumer income.

    This deficiency of effective purchasing-power increases with the intensified use of technology where “machine charges” increase relative to labour charges. The more we modernize our economy the more the the financial system become unbalanced or non- self-liquidating and sabotages the real gains we make in actual physical efficiency. Paradoxically this occurs because of increasing allocated capital charges which must be added to the income-generating costs of wages, salaries and dividends in each cycle of industrial cost-accountancy. We attempt to compensate this growing chasm between financial costs and incomes by contracting ever-larger debts to banking institutions who create loans as new credit owing as a debt to themselves. This does not actually liquidate production costs but passes them on as an inflationary charge against future production cycles. We also engage in vast new capital expenditures such as superfluous capital works and war production so to generate incomes which can claim not current but past production. We also engage in irrational and provocative attempts to export more goods than we import.

    Douglas proposed what should be the obvious solution: Establish a National Credit Account as an actuarial estimate of the nation’s potentially productive assets, i.e., its Real Credit–everything which if used for production could create price. Ensure that all new production is financed by new credits issued by banks in the customary manner. Draw down the costs of all such new production from the National Credit Account but credit this Account with all new finished production. Draw down from the National Credit Account, as items of consumption, funds to pay to each citizen a National Dividend and to each retailer a sum determined by the ration of national consumption to production enabling such retailers to reduce final retail prices at point of sale, i.e., to established Compensated Prices which will be much lower relative to conventionally accounted prices. Because the National Credit Account will be credited with all new capital production it will always be growing regardless of debt-free money being withdraw from it for financing of National Dividends and Compensated Prices. The physical cost of production, i.e., the human and non-human energy and materials required has all been provided when a good is completed for use. The is no attached physical debt and the financial system should accurately reflect this fact. There should be no need on a macro-economic level any consumer debt whatsoever.

    Douglas’s proposals would give us increasing abundance with falling retail prices and an opportunity for increasing leisure. “Unemployment would been appreciated for the blessing it is in actuality. We would no longer be required to finance purchase of current production by incomes derived from additional increasingly irrelevant, wasteful and destructive so-called “economic” activity. The primary cause of international friction and war would be eliminated as nations would be able to engage in genuine trade rather than attempts to export in excess of import in order to capture external credits in an attempt to compensate for internal insufficiency of consumer purchasing-power. We could emerge into a secure and civilized Civilization–something that is quite impossible under the existing defective financial system.

    Refer:
    relative to total costs and prices as the need for paid work is reduced. In the days of Merry England the people enjoyed approximately 150 holidays per year and yet at a much lower level of technology yet still provided for their living needs. That we should attempt to maintain “full-emplayment” in the present age of super-production is a complete anachronism..

    Nearly a century ago the progressive displacement of labour by technology was observed and accurately predicted to increase exponentially by the late British engineer, Major Clifford Hugh Douglas whose ideas became known a Social Credit. Douglas explained the necessity to devise a method of distribution independent upon paid labour. While Assistant Director of the Royal Aircraft factory at farnborough and through study of the accounts of approximately one-hundred other British firms he confirmed that every factory, except any facing bankruptcy, creates financial costs and prices in greater volume than it distributes effective incomes. An increasing “gap” is created between final prices and effective consumer income.

    This deficiency of effective purchasing-power increases with the intensified use of technology where “machine charges” increase relative to labour charges. The more we modernize our economy the more the the financial system become unbalanced or non- self-liquidating and sabotages the real gains we make in actual physical efficiency. Paradoxically this occurs because of increasing allocated capital charges which must be added to the income-generating costs of wages, salaries and dividends in each cycle of industrial cost-accountancy. We attempt to compensate this growing chasm between financial costs and incomes by contracting ever-larger debts to banking institutions who create loans as new credit owing as a debt to themselves. This does not actually liquidate production costs but passes them on as an inflationary charge against future production cycles. We also engage in vast new capital expenditures such as superfluous capital works and war production so to generate incomes which can claim not current but past production. We also engage in irrational and provocative attempts to export more goods than we import.

    Douglas proposed what should be the obvious solution: Establish a National Credit Account as an actuarial estimate of the nation’s potentially productive assets, i.e., its Real Credit–everything which if used for production could create price. Ensure that all new production is financed by new credits issued by banks in the customary manner. Draw down the costs of all such new production from the National Credit Account but credit this Account with all new finished production. Draw down from the National Credit Account, as items of consumption, funds to pay to each citizen a National Dividend and to each retailer a sum determined by the ration of national consumption to production enabling such retailers to reduce final retail prices at point of sale, i.e., to established Compensated Prices which will be much lower relative to conventionally accounted prices. Because the National Credit Account will be credited with all new capital production it will always be growing regardless of debt-free money being withdraw from it for financing of National Dividends and Compensated Prices. The physical cost of production, i.e., the human and non-human energy and materials required has all been provided when a good is completed for use. The is no attached physical debt and the financial system should accurately reflect this fact. There should be no need on a macro-economic level any consumer debt whatsoever.

    Douglas’s proposals would give us increasing abundance with falling retail prices reflecting increased efficiency of production and an opportunity for increasing leisure. “Unemployment would been appreciated for the blessing it is in actuality. We would no longer be required to finance purchase of current production by incomes derived from additional increasingly irrelevant, wasteful and destructive so-called “economic” activity. The primary cause of international friction and war would be eliminated as nations would be able to engage in genuine trade rather than attempts to export in excess of import in an effort to capture external credits in an attempt to compensate for internal insufficiency of consumer purchasing-power. We could emerge into a secure and abundant Civilization–something that is quite impossible under the existing defective financial system.

    Refer: http://www.socred.org
    Youtube: Social Credit Table Talk
    Youtube: Social Credit, Unemployment and Leisure
    Wikipedia: Social Credit

  2. My apologies for the original post which for some reason was badly jumbled. Here is a proper rendition:

    Your article on “The Shrinking Need for a Workforce”, with accompanying excellent video, addresses the central issue of our amazing age. How blessed we are in having a marvellous technology enabling us to produce more and more of our desired and/or needed goods and services with decreasing human effort, with an ever-growing opportunity for expanding leisure in a cultured society. The so-called “problem” of growing “unemployment” is not a problem at all if we divorce the right to consumption from earned incomes. What constitutes the problem is an insufficiency of total incomes. The core problem is an insufficiency of total incomes relative to total costs and prices as the need for paid work is reduced. In the days of Merry England the people enjoyed approximately 150 holidays per year and yet, at a much lower level of technology, still provided for their living needs. That we should attempt to maintain “full-emplayment” in the present age of super-production is a complete anachronism.

    Nearly a century ago the progressive displacement of labour by technology was observed and accurately predicted to increase exponentially by the late British engineer, Major Clifford Hugh Douglas, whose ideas became known as Social Credit. Douglas explained the necessity to devise a method of distribution independent of paid labour. While Assistant Director of the Royal Aircraft Factory at Farnborough in England, and through study of the accounts of approximately one-hundred other British firms he confirmed that every factory, except any facing bankruptcy, created financial costs and prices in greater volume than it distributed effective incomes. In the normal operation of the economy an increasing “gap” is created between final prices and effective consumer income.

    This deficiency of effective purchasing-power increases with the intensified use of technology where “machine charges” increase relative to labour charges. The more we modernize our economy the more the the financial system becomes unbalanced or non- self-liquidating and sabotages the real gains we make in actual physical efficiency. Paradoxically, this phenomenon occurs because of increasing allocated capital charges which must be added to the income-generating costs of wages, salaries and dividends in each cycle of industrial cost-accountancy. We attempt to compensate this growing chasm between financial costs and incomes by contracting ever-larger debts to banking institutions which create loans as new credit owing as a debt to themselves. This does not actually liquidate production costs but passes them on as an inflationary charge against future production cycles. We also engage in vast new capital expenditures such as superfluous capital works and war production so to generate incomes which can claim not current but past production. We also engage in irrational and internationally provocative attempts to export more goods than we import.

    Douglas proposed what should be the obvious solution: Establish a National Credit Account as an actuarial estimate of the nation’s potentially productive assets, i.e., its Real Credit–everything which if used for production could create prices. Ensure that all new production is financed by new credits issued by banks in the customary manner. Draw down the costs of all such new production in progress from the National Credit Account but credit this Account with all new finished production. Draw down from the National Credit Account, as items of consumption, funds to pay to each citizen a National Dividend and to each retailer a sum determined by the decreasing ratio of national consumption to production, enabling such retailers to reduce final retail prices at point of sale, i.e., to establish Compensated Prices which will be much lower relative to conventionally accounted prices. Because the National Credit Account will be credited with all new capital production it will always be growing regardless of debt-free money being withdraw from it for financing of National Dividends and Compensated Prices. The physical cost of production, i.e., the human and non-human energy and materials required, has all been provided when a good is completed for use. The is no attached physical debt to such items and the financial system should accurately reflect this fact. There should be no need on a macro-economic level for any consumer debt whatsoever.

    Douglas’s proposals would give us increasing abundance with falling retail prices and an opportunity for increasing leisure. “Unemployment” would been appreciated as the blessing it is in actuality. We would no longer be required to finance purchases of current production by incomes derived from additional increasingly irrelevant, wasteful and destructive so-called “economic” activity. The primary cause of international friction and war would be eliminated as nations would be able to engage in genuine balanced trade rather than attempting to force exports in excess of imports in order to capture external credits in an attempt to compensate for internal insufficiency of consumer purchasing-power. We could emerge into a secure, leisured and cultured Civilization–something that is quite impossible under the existing defective financial system.

    Refer: http://www.socred.org
    Youtube: Social Credit Table Talk
    Youtube: Social Credit, Unemployment and Leisure
    Wikipedia: Social Credit

    • I want to thank you for a well thought out response. In my post, http://mikestreetstation.wordpress.com/2014/09/01/the-shrinking-need-for-a-workforce-this-time-its-different/ , I didn’t really plunge into the leisure time aspect of increased automation. I mainly focused on the issue of our economy reaching an
      “economic singularity” in which perhaps the majority of people would be unqualified and perhaps untrainable for the jobs available in the economy. Perhaps I can discuss the results of massive amounts of the population permanently sidelined from employment in another post.
      As far as Social Credit goes, I’m not a total stranger to the concept and in fact discussed it in a post about 2 years ago, http://mikestreetstation.wordpress.com/2012/07/18/for-us-who-didnt-build-that/.
      Given the lack of any real work examples of a Social Credit society, it’s hard to visualize how it would work in practice in a large industrial nation. I don’t think it would look much different than a nation with a large percentage of its population on welfare. That I can visualize, and it doesn’t look too pretty. The only difference would be the mechanism of providing the welfare. In US terms, it would be like the Federal Reserve establishing a national dividend and simply “printing” the money and giving it to citizens directly. Maybe if some distressed nation that needs to do something different, like Argentina or Greece, adopts social credit the world can watch the results and see if it has actually hit on something new or is just another excuse for welfare statism.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s