The Carmichael Show Cancelled

I was disappointed to hear that The Carmichael Show was being cancelled after the completion of its third season.   A Google search to try to find an explanation on the show’s cancellation pulled up articles called NBC Execs Open Up About ‘Carmichael Show’ Cancellation which… do not really answer the question as to why the show was cancelled.

“I think the collective decision was maybe [that] it’s best to let the show end,” NBC entertainment president Jennifer Salke told reporters. “I have to say personally for all of us, it’s a really hard decision that wasn’t just made on one side of things. It was one of those difficult decisions that kind of live with you for a while that you don’t feel great about because you wish it had done better. … This was the situation we found ourselves in.”  

OK yhat tells me nothing, although the very next paragraph does add a little bit of context.

The beloved series, which wraps its run later this month on the network, was one of NBC’s rare co-productions with an outside studio, 20th Century Television Fox. That, combined with the tepid ratings for the show, led to the cancellation.

Tepid rating I can understand, although I find it odd that it would happen to this show. If there is any show that qualifies as a worthy successor to Norman Lear’s All in the Family, it’s this one.  The show has tackled some pretty controversial topics, such as gun control, religion, infidelity, Bill Cosby,  gentrification, Muslims, depression, gender roles, gun violence, pornography, and of course Donald Trump.  Yet the show has received zero buzz.  Black-ish, a show I trashed pretty severely when it first came out is a critical and ratings success. The Carmichael Show is a critical success…and that’s it. So the lesson here is that I’m the last person you should come to when it comes to evaluating black TV shows.

As a comedian Jerrod Carmichael, is dark and depressing.  Watching his HBO Special “8” really demonstrates just how dark.  After watching that show, I wouldn’t have been surprised if I had heard that Carmichael had walked off set and hung himself in his dressing room.  That’s a viewpoint that isn’t exactly reflected in his sitcom, but then, I’ve no idea what happens during production.

The show’s season finale airs August 9th, but I would still recommend the show in whatever streaming platform it lands on.  It’s a sitcom with real issues and laughs, and it’s damn near impossible to find that combination.

 

 

 

Quickie Fall Reviews: Black-ish

Black-ish is the latest attempt to sell an ethnic sitcom to the wider, non ethnic audience.  Unlike the Cosby Show, in which a Black upper middle class family has the same concerns as any non Black upper middle class, and being Black was not a prominent part of the show, Black-ish is about nothing else but being Black.  It’s about upper middle class Black people who are concerned about being Black, ruminating what it means to be Black, embracing Black culture, maintaining Black culture, what is Black Culture… in short, it’s all Black, all the time.

Or at least that’s the case for the main character, Heathcliff Huxtable…err I mean Andre Johnson.  Anthony Anderson plays the Bill Cosby character in this Cosby show with guilt that can’t seem to stop thinking about race and its effect on virtually every aspect of his life.  I literally could not keep track of the number of stereotypes that this show…not skewered like you would think, but embraced. The main character is desperate to get his family playing basketball, eating fried chicken, you name it.

The lesson here is that assimilation to middle class values is bad, and “keeping it real” is good.  But maybe that’s just my white privilege talking.  Could this really be a positive uplifting show that I can’t see because of my privilege?  If so, how do I “check my privilege” in order to understand the true intent?

After typing into Google, “Am I racist for thinking the new show Black-ish is racist?”  I did find there was an actual Change.org petition requesting the show be dropped from the fall schedule because…it’s racist.  So I’m not alone on that.  But being racist isn’t even the worst sin this show commits.

It’s not funny.

Based on the pilot episode, the laughs were pretty sparse, and by sparse, I mean I didn’t laugh once, although maybe I missed something since I was constantly checking the clock.  If the show had been racist and funny, this would have been a totally different review. Some of the stuff that white people like is Black comedians playing up Black stereotypes.  Oh, how white people like that!  But for a show in which the main character wants to base his life on a racist parody of Black life you would think there would be laughs.

So I cannot give this show my much coveted thumbs up. There might be a Black audience for this show, and maybe it could find a second life on BET, but I don’t think that ABC is going to be keeping this.