Why Blacks will continue to hate Cops

In the aftermath of the Grand Jury decision not to indict Officer Darren Wilson in the death of Michael Brown, began the most predictable riot in US history.  Everyone knew, as soon as the decision not to indict was released (and let’s be honest, we all kind of knew that would be the decision), that the city would burn, and sure enough, it did.  The riots seemed to take on an air of a Thanksgiving Day football game; much anticipated, scheduled in advance, and sure to provide moments of high drama.

guy fawkes guy fawkes 2 white rioters white rioters 2

One of the surprising moments of riot drama that I observed was how many white people were rioting.  There seemed to be an abnormal amount of white guys with Guy Fawkes masks (or should I call them V for Vendetta masks? The trademark and profits from their sale go to Time Warner) running around causing mayhem.  I suppose one can look at that as a sign of racial progress, a racial riot with multiracial participants.  And also a bit of irony.  White guys helping to burn down black and minority businesses because…racism.   Go figure.

So the other shoe had finally dropped.  No one was satisfied and no one would have ever been satisfied.  Even if Wilson had been indicted we would have spent two years fighting the same battles over and over, and Wilson would have most likely been acquitted, and everyone who said they would be satisfied with an indictment, and an arrest, and a trial, would still not be satisfied, just like with George Zimmerman.

Back in August I wrote about the immediate fallout from the Michael Brown shooting and suggested that the real solution to Black distrust of White cops was…more black cops. Well apparently that was an issue that local police departments in the Central Florida area have been struggling with for years. Apparently qualified minority candidates are much sought after, and hard to attract.  The Daytona Beach News Journal did a story on just that issue:

In South Daytona, Wright realizes his agency does not reflect the city’s population, where 1,034 of the 13,177 residents are black, according to the most recent Census figures.

“Qualified minority applicants go to the larger agencies that offer more support, more equipment and more opportunities for advancement and specialization,” Wright said recently. “We try to capitalize on being a small department, but it just doesn’t pan out.”

Wright’s department has 28 sworn positions and three part-time officers. He said he just can’t compete with the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office or Daytona Beach Police Department when it comes to pay scale or opportunities for advancement.

Administrators in larger departments also realize the scope of the problem. Volusia County’s population tops 500,000, with a black population of 11 percent, or 55,088. And while the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office has 455 sworn law enforcement officers, just 17 — or 3.7 percent — are black.

The agency has more Hispanic officers than black officers — 32, or 7 percent — but that is still below the countywide Hispanic population of 12 percent. Deltona, a city of 86,290 that contracts with the Sheriff’s Office for law enforcement, has a Hispanic population of 26,060, or 30.2 percent.

So Black police candidates are attracted to larger departments where pay, benefits, and opportunities to advance are greater.  Then who are the white guys filling the ranks of small departments?

What can we do to increase the number of Black and Hispanic candidates?

The Volusia sheriff mentioned a sponsorship program through his office that will pay candidates who fit certain financial criteria to attend police academy. The agency does its best to advertise the program — something that has not been lost on the Volusia County Hispanic Association.

“We try to make people aware of the opportunity, so they can apply and train for the sponsorship,” Volusia County Hispanic Association spokeswoman Emma Santiago said. “It would be great to reflect the makeup of the community, but we want the best qualified to fill those positions.”

So it sounds like they are going all out for qualified minority candidates, so why don’t we have all of the Black and Hispanic law enforcement officers we need?

The applicant pool of qualified minorities “has been disappointingly small,” sheriff’s spokesman Gary Davidson said in a written response to questions. “When it comes to minority candidates, the reality is that all of the agencies essentially are competing with each other for the same applicant pool.”

This point, that there a tiny pool of “qualified applicants” isn’t otherwise explained, but it appears to be the real issue to why my idea of Black communities being policed by Black police officers, isn’t likely to ever happen. One assumes that Law Enforcement faces similar problems to the military when it comes to recruiting; performance on standardized testing, non obese, with no criminal record… apparently people who can meet these simple qualifications are becoming a smaller and smaller part of the potential hiring pool.

So increasingly, and with the help of friendly SJWs in Guy Fawkes masks, Black America will feel like they are living under occupation.  And as their feelings for, and reactions to, law enforcement become increasingly negative, that will become a self fulfilling prophecy.

 

 

 

Ferguson’s Affirmative Action Solution

Part of the fallout of the Trayvon Martin shooting was a change at the top for Sanford PD.  Sanford Police Chief Bill Lee first stepped down from his position, and then later, after offering to resign, was fired.  Lee was replaced by Cecil E. Smith as the new Sanford Police chief. In Ferguson, MO, Police Chief Thomas Jackson had his entire police department shunted to the sidelines as the Governor put the State Police, lead by Captain Ron Johnson, in charge.  The common thread of course is that in both racially charged cases, a white person was replaced by a black person.

Of course, in the never ending war on noticing, we…aren’t supposed to notice that.  It’s just a guy bungling the situation replaced by someone who is hopefully more competent.  But in both cases with black victims and an activated civil rights establishment on the march; literally on the march, it makes perfect sense that the head of the law enforcement agency in question be headed by someone who’s black.

And as a PR move, it’s worked great.

The media is full of respectful and flattering stories of Captain Ronald Johnson and it’s not just media hype, he’s achieved real results in bringing a boiling situation to a simmer and getting control of the looting after the Ferguson Police Department’s heavy handed military occupation-like attempt to gain control through superior firepower.  And although Johnson does deserve all due credit for that, the fact is that he would not have been able to do that if he were white.

In the post civil rights era, the realization of this started back in the infamous Rodney King beating and has continued up through the age of a Black President, from Trayvon Martin to Michael Brown.  Black people do not trust white cops.  They never have, and are unlikely to start in any of our lifetimes.  We can gnash our teeth of this, and try even more community outreach programs that will fail like all the ones before, but in a town like Ferguson, MO, with a black population of 67%, the police department is 94% white.

The consequences of this are that the black population feels like they are under occupation, and as demonstrated by the Ferguson PD overkill to the looting, they clearly think they are occupying hostile territory. Black President or no, this is an extremely racially divided country, and not because of this or that racial crisis that the media loves to gin up, but because that is our default position.  Sad to say, but the racial divide is normal.  It’s not just a media creation (although they do love to exploit it).  White people like to pretend that after the civil rights era it’s all taken care of, and will point to our Black President as proof, “See there?  Black guy; mission accomplished.”

Mission not accomplished and it may never be accomplished.  We can of course, go on and pretend that this isn’t a divided country, or we can stare down reality and admit that we have problems that another commission, or inner city funding, is not going to solve.

Civil society and all of the threads that make a society work depend on social trust.  That is increasingly in short supply in our society, but it is clearly missing in the relationship between Blacks and police, otherwise we wouldn’t have ‘The Talk.’  But, if we’re willing to accept these painful truths maybe we can do something to mitigate the damage these incidents play on our national psyche.  We need to recognize that Black people really want to be policed by Black cops.

I’m no fan of the concept of Affirmative Action.  I think it’s a legal and constitutional stain on the country, but you know, we have a lot of stains.  Maybe we ought to recognize that for black people, they need the trust in law enforcement that black law enforcement can provide and that white law enforcement, no matter how well meaning, will never be able to.  So what am I suggesting?  I think we need black cops to police black areas.  This would require a massive hiring of new black police officers to police these areas, so this isn’t something that would happen overnight.  It would take years to implement.  But I think the benefits make it worth pursuing, and we certainly haven’t come up with anything else that’s made much of a difference.

But a major nationwide recruiting effort with the subsequent publicity might make a lot of black youth consider a career in law enforcement that they wouldn’t otherwise have even considered.  And not for nothing, but these are considered “good jobs.” People in high crime areas might consider calling the cops more, and actually talking to them, instead of avoiding “snitching.”  If they can start trusting their local cop on the beat, maybe they can start trusting law enforcement at large.  Certainly if a black cop shoots a black suspect, it’s not going raise the ire of the civil rights establishment.  Eventually, when those incidents happen, maybe black people will have the same reaction to those shootings that white people have when a white or black cop shoots a white suspect; ignore it.  Generally we default assume the guy had it coming, not that the cop set out to specifically murder someone.

It’s a low bar of achievement I realize, but we have to accept that for our racially divided society, we can’t even reach that low bar.  We need to try something, even if means recognizing painful truths.